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Words of Wisdom

Selections of Theravada Buddhism Pali Chant Translations, Part 1 of 2

2021-08-30
Language:English
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The Pali Canon or Pali Tipitaka are a collection of sacred Buddhist Pali language texts, which form the foundation of Theravada Buddhism. Although Pali is an ancient language of the Indian subcontinent, it is still the main language for studying Theravada Buddhism, even though translations of many languages can now be found. Today, we are honored to present some translations of Theravada Buddhism Pali Chants which are recited by both monastic and lay practitioners in everyday life.

Homage to the Buddha Chant “The Tathāgata is the Pure One, the Perfectly Enlightened One. He is impeccable in conduct and understanding, The Accomplished One, The Knower of the Worlds. He trains perfectly those who wish to be trained. He is Teacher of gods and humans. He is awake and holy.

The Five Precepts Chant “I undertake the precept to refrain from taking the life of any living creature. I undertake the precept to refrain from taking that which is not given. I undertake the precept to refrain from sexual misconduct. I undertake the precept to refrain from lying. I undertake the precept to refrain from consuming intoxicating drink and drugs which lead to carelessness. These are the Five Precepts; virtue is the source of happiness virtue is the source of true wealth, virtue is the source of peacefulness — Therefore let virtue be purified”

Five Subjects for Frequent Recollection “I am of the nature to age, I have not gone beyond ageing。I am of the nature to sicken, I have not gone beyond sickness. I am of the nature to die, I have not gone beyond dying. All that is mine, beloved and pleasing, will become otherwise, will become separated from me.

The Teaching on the Noble Eightfold Path “This is the Noble Eightfold Path, Which is as follows: Right View, Right Intention, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, Right Concentration.” “And what, bhikkhus, is Right Mindfulness? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body, Ardent, fully aware and mindful, Having put away covetousness and grief for the world; He abides contemplating feelings as feelings Ardent, fully aware and mindful, Having put away covetousness and grief for the world; He abides contemplating mind as mind, Ardent, fully aware and mindful, Having put away covetousness and grief for the world; He abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects, Ardent, fully aware and mindful, Having put away covetousness and grief for the world: This, bhikkhus, is called Right Mindfulness.”
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