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Selflessness and Humility, Part 9 of 12, Dec. 16-17, 2006

2023-01-04
Lecture Language:English
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Well, the child was not satisfied, so she went to school and complained to her friend, “You know, my mom never says how old she is, how much she weighs. What’s the point?” And the girlfriend says, “Well, you don’t have to ask. Look at her driver’s license. It’s all there.” The little girl goes home and secretly goes into her mother’s bag and looks for the driver’s license.

See that? We only work... Normally we just try to work quietly, without making noise, without doing a lot of advertising or seeking attention, but people still notice. And that’s why they gave me, us – meaning I represented you – this Gusi Peace Prize. It’s for you, for us, not just for me. I don’t need something like that. I went there because of us. I was in the Philippines because of this peace prize for you, so that you know: “Oh, it’s worth the effort. People have noticed us.” And that has encouraged us a bit, and that is good for you, for us. It’s not that we needed it, but at least we have set a good example for the world, and people have noticed it. And that means they will imitate and follow us. Perhaps not many, not all, but some people will. We have touched their hearts. We have awakened their nobility. And that’s why I went to the Philippines.

Before I went, I was thinking, “Oh man, it’s such a long trip. So far, and it’s so hot there.” I wasn’t sure... I was sick. I didn’t know if I should go. I don’t really enjoy being with other people like that, always shaking hands, looking at the camera. I thought I couldn’t do it. Because I am always shy. Really, I’m very shy. Not with you, but with the general public, I am always shy, but I don’t show it. I overcome my shyness so that I can complete my work. If I always think, “Oh, I’m so shy, I’m so shy, ...” then we cannot manage.

And then it was OK like that. So I went there, and it’s already done; it’s already behind us. And it’s all for you, because I am too lazy, as I’ve told you before, too lazy to travel. But now I’m feeling fit again, to go anywhere, even to the Moon or a star.

Maybe we can go to the Moon later and meditate up there. Who knows? Perhaps we can buy a UFO and all move there. Maybe there are no police and no neighbors, and we’ll bring our dog- and cat-people and the children – everyone will come along, perhaps. (We’ll go at once.) Everybody will come. Who knows? Maybe we can buy a UFO soon. It might be very expensive, but we’ll all empty our pockets and buy it. Over there, we don’t need money anymore. Perhaps the atmosphere is wonderful over there, so we don’t need to eat or drink anymore. We just meditate all day long and laugh. No (vegan) cakes, no (vegan) candies, but OK.

We’re going to have lunch now. My German is good again. Don’t eat too much. OK, see you later. Thank you for a good meditation without snoring – a little, but that’s normal. Good, good. Go eat. Go eat. See you later. (Goodbye.) Goodbye.

How many people from Munich? (Munich, how many? Please raise hands.) Thirty-one? How did you get here? (Car, yes, by car.) Some stayed home. (Yes.) Are they unemployed or working? (Working... going to work.) Going to work is good. But be honest. (Yes.) Don’t call and say, “I’m sick.” No, never. If you say something like that, you really will get sick maybe not today, but later.

I don’t have such good things at home. Yes, really. With us, everything is very simple. In my house, it’s very simple. I don’t have such good things like you have here – not even once a week or once a month. Maybe once a year! We’re busy. We don’t have time for cooking, and I don’t have a good cook. Just anybody cooks anything, and everybody just eats anytime, anything. And if you don’t eat, that’s it; it’s your problem.

At home, we eat simply because we don’t have time to cook. And besides, we don’t have good cooks. And they cook anything. They know we don’t have a choice. I have no choice in what I eat. That’s my problem. (Then You come here, and we’ll cook.) Yes, then I’ll get too fat, like a balloon. Then you’ll have to roll me, not walk, but roll.

So, do you like it? Yes? (Yes.) It’s not German food, but that’s OK? (Nevertheless, we love it.) If it tastes good, then it doesn’t matter what it is. I’m glad to hear that. OK, good. I might have to move here, too, just to eat. Or fly here every day to eat and then fly back again. (We’ll come to visit and cook.) Yes? Come to visit? To eat or to cook? (To cook.) Can you cook something like that? (Some, not all, but I can learn.) Wow, that’s nice, very, very diligent.

I’m sorry to disturb your dinner. (That’s OK.) Please go enjoy because they cooked wonderful things here. (They do. It’s beautiful food.) Please go enjoy. It’s better than in Surrey. It’s the best cooking team I’ve ever seen. (Wow!) I can come back here. It’s the best cooking team. (Here?) Yes. (Wow!) At least in Europe. It’s the best cooking team. My God, so many beautiful things. All these delicacies.

In Âu Lạc (Vietnam), you don’t eat like this every day. These kinds of things we don’t even have every day in Âu Lạc (Vietnam). And they cook them so quickly. (Yes.) Everything is made so fast and so nice, right? It tastes good, doesn’t it? (Very good. Yes.) Nice. And they cook with love, so it’s so nice. Some of these dishes, at least three. Just to eat here. What I mean is, you eat at least two or three times as much here.

It’s special, isn’t it? From different regions. The one that is a bit spicy is from Central Âu Lạc (Vietnam), and the sweet one is from South Âu Lạc (Vietnam). And there is also one that is cut into small pieces. Vegan pork skin? (Yes.) (Vegan pork skin.) That is also from South Âu Lạc (Vietnam). Where did you buy this vegan pork skin? Âu Lạc. (South Âu Lạc.) South Âu Lạc. At least he has three delicacies. Specialties of the area.

Congratulations. At least you can eat here, even if it’s always too small, and the meditation is always too... The eye loves food, that’s the most important thing. Yes, when we meditate, there is nothing left that we can enjoy. No men, no women, everything gone – no sex. Although there are women and men, but no more sex. So, you can at least eat. At least it’s something to feel good, right? Yeah, it’s like that. It’s not for children. You don’t understand anyway. You understand everything or not? (Yes.) Anybody who doesn’t understand? Is there anyone who doesn’t understand? Ah, that’s your problem. If so, then it’s not my problem.

There’s a joke. A girl, about 12 years old, asks her mother, “Mom, how old are you?” And the mom says, “You don’t ask that. We women don’t talk about our age.” The child was not satisfied and continued to ask, “Mom, how much do you weigh?” So, it means how fat are you? The mom is already over 50 and well-built. And the mom says, “You shouldn’t ask that either. We women don’t take our weight that seriously, so we don’t talk about it.”

Well, the child was not satisfied, so she went to school and complained to her friend, “You know, my mom never says how old she is, how much she weighs. What’s the point?” And the girlfriend says, “Well, you don’t have to ask. Look at her driver’s license. It’s all there.” The little girl goes home and secretly goes into her mother’s bag and looks for the driver’s license. Ah, it’s all there, indeed.

Then the girl goes to her mom, “Mom, I know everything.” Mom is surprised, “You know what? What do you know?” And the girl says, “I already know you’re 50 years old, you weigh 300 pounds (136 kg), and I also know why Daddy left you.” Oh, the mom is shocked. “How do you know that? And why, tell me, why did Daddy leave me? Why?” “Because you’ve got an F in sex.”

F for female. F for feminine. (Yes.) They always say sex M or F. You understand? (Yes.) Sex means just gender. (Yes.) Because you got an F in sex. So the kids today know more than we do.

There’s another joke while we are here already. Yes, otherwise they (the children) go and ask somewhere else, and that’s even worse. A dad is sitting on the sofa with his son, man to man talk. The son is only 14 years old. Something like that, 14 years old. The daddy says, “You know what? This thing between men and women, it’s too early for you. You’ve always asked me, but I couldn’t explain it to you yet. And if, even if I wanted to explain it to you, it’s difficult. I couldn’t explain it.” And the 14-year-old son looks his dad in the eye and says, “Dad, what you don’t know, just ask me.” It’s a nice joke, but it’s just a joke.

Look, our chef, he also has a hat on. I’m glad you guys are enjoying it. It’s nice. See you later. (Yes.)

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