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The Wondrous World of African Cape Buffalo-People

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Today I will introduce you to my subspecies that inhabit the grassy plains south of the Congo River basin. Instead of just two impressive projections on either side of our head, we have a continuous piece of bone on top that forms a protective shield called a “boss.”

Let me provide you with a more detailed description of Cape buffalo-people. A full-grown male, called a bull, is generally around 150 centimeters tall at the shoulder, has short, stocky legs, and can weigh between 425 and 900 kilograms. Our adult females, called cows, are normally smaller. But we are all massive and carry our head low relative to our back. Our front hooves are wider than the rear to support the extra weight. Beneath our horns, you will find a rather stern-looking face softened by a pair of floppy ears.

The main element of our diet is coarse grass, for which we are equipped with a wide mouth, extra incisor teeth, and a skillful tongue. We also drink copious amounts of water, up to 35 liters at a time. That is why we make sure a dependable source is never more than a day away.

Most Cape buffalo-people choose to live in a large herd for safety reasons, and in that setting, we are very friendly with each other. Among the males, the one with the most substantial horns is usually acknowledged to be the leader. Our natural life span ranges from 15 to 25 years.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) assessed our species in 2018 and found our numbers were decreasing. Sadly, the research team reported that the causes were mostly related to human activity. The list included climate change, severe weather, civil unrest, military exercises, and war. Syncerus caffer, to which I belong, is categorized as “Near Threatened,” and that prompts me to beg all people: Please remember you are only guests here, temporary visitors to this planet. What will your legacy be? If you forsake your violent ways now, you can still leave your next generation the message of reverence, gratitude, and love for everything created by the Divine.
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