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From the Sacred Jainism Scripture – “Uttaradhyayana,” Lectures 24 and 25, Part 1 of 2

2023-04-05
Lingua:English
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We now invite you to listen to the 24th lecture of the Uttaradhyayana sutra – one of the most important scriptures in Jainism. This lecture is titled, “The Samitis,” and discusses the Samitis, which are the five rules of conduct, and the Guptis, which are the three rules of avoidance of misconduct in Jainism.

“The Samitis (the rules of conduct) are: 1. îryâ-samiti (going by paths trodden by men, beasts, carts, and looking carefully so as not to occasion the death of any living creature); 2. bhâshâ-samiti (gentle, salutary, sweet, righteous speech); 3. êshanâ-samiti (receiving alms in a manner to avoid the 42 faults that are laid down); 4. âdâna-samiti (receiving and keeping of the things necessary for religious exercises, after having carefully examined them); 5. ukkâra-samiti (performing the operations of nature in an unfrequented place).

The three Guptis (which are here included in the term Samiti in its wider application) are: 1. mano-gupti (preventing the mind from wandering in the forest of sensual pleasures by employing it in contemplation, and study); 2. vâg-gupti (preventing the tongue from saying bad things by a vow of silence); 3. kâya-gupti (putting the body in an immovable posture as in the case of Kâyôtsarga).”

“With regard to substance: the (walking monk) should look with his eyes; with regard to place: the space of a yuga; with regard to time: as long as he walks; and with regard to condition of mind: carefully. He walks carefully who pays attention only to his walk and his body (executing it), whilst he avoids attending to the objects of sense, but (minds) his study, the latter in all five ways.”

“To give way to: anger, pride, deceit and greed, laughter, fear, loquacity and slander; these eight faults should a well-disciplined monk avoid; he should use blameless and concise speech at the proper time.”

“A zealous monk should prevent his mind from desires for the misfortune of somebody else, from thoughts on acts which cause misery to living beings, and from thoughts on acts which cause their destruction.”

“This is the essence of the creed, which a sage should thoroughly put into practice; such a wise man will soon get beyond the Circle of Births. Thus, I say.”
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